• Johnstons Continue Family Tradition at MHP
    Johnstons Continue Family Tradition at MHP

    “Children are a gift who can complement your life and come along for the ride,” a parenting philosophy that Katie and Jesse Johnston live by. Welcoming the…

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  • Ginger Grubb Appreciates Coordinated Care at MHP
    Ginger Grubb Appreciates Coordinated Care at MHP

    There are few things in life more personal than who you trust with your well-being. For Ginger Grubb, choosing Mahaska Health Partnership for her healthcare…

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  • Personalized Care Worth the Drive for Charles Drew
    Personalized Care Worth the Drive for Charles Drew

    Charles Drew of Eddyville understands the importance of keeping a great primary care provider, even if it means a slightly longer drive to appointments.

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  • First Baby of 2016
    First Baby of 2016

    Adam Patrick Peterson was born at 3:16 pm on Jan. 3, 2016, making him Mahaska Health Partnership’s 2016 New Year’s Baby. Adam weighed 8 lbs., 2 oz., and…

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  • Community Helps Fulfill Woman's Wish to See Son Married
    Community Helps Fulfill Woman's Wish to See Son Married

    CarolAnne Briggs, 58, entered the Serenity House on Sept. 29, 2015, after years of battling liver disease from Hepatitis C. Her husband, Eric, said she…

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  • Lifelong Patient Receives Outstanding Care at MHP
    Lifelong Patient Receives Outstanding Care at MHP

    Bernice DeYoung of New Sharon, IA, has been entrusting her medical care to Mahaska Health Partnership for many years. “I actually used to work at MHP y…

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Provider Focus

EverettHD2016FAPCase Everett, MD

Dr. Case Everett returns home to begin family practice and obstetrical care at MHP.

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Gynecologic Cancer Awareness

Mahaska Health Partnership Recognizes Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month

Mahaska Health Partnership OB-GYN Specialist Jeffrey Fowler, DO, urges women to get regular screenings to prevent gynecologic cancer; which includes all cancers that can occur in a woman’s reproductive organs.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the most common types of gynecologic cancer are ovarian, cervical, vulvar, vaginal and uterine. Ovarian cancer is the deadliest of these and is sometimes referred to as the “Silent Killer” because of its lack of symptoms. Worldwide, cervical cancer is the third most common cancer for women, but is in decline in the US due to increased screening.

“Getting a regular pap test is the best defense women have for protecting themselves against cervical cancer,” Dr. Fowler stressed. “These tests can usually detect abnormal cells before they become cancerous.”

This past spring, the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force updated recommendations regarding the frequency of pap smear tests in women. Screening with pap tests should begin at age 21, or at the onset of sexual activity. Women ages 30-65 only need to be screened with a pap and HPV test once every five years if they have no abnormal history. Finally, women age 65 and older with no history of abnormal pap tests no longer need cervical screening, but should continue regular physicals.

Dr. Fowler noted that not all gynecological cancers can be detected with a pap test. Each cancer is unique with its own signs and symptoms, risk factors and prevention strategies. All women are at risk for gynecological cancers, but some risk increases with age. “The most important thing to remember is that the earlier the cancer is found, the more effective the treatment will be,” said Dr. Fowler.

Symptoms for gynecologic cancers vary. The CDC suggests you consult your primary care provider if you are experiencing abnormal vaginal bleeding or discharge, pelvic pain or pressure, abdominal or back pain, bloating, changes in bathroom habits or changes is the appearance of your reproductive organs.